San Antonio Roundup April 2021

April 25, 2021 Blog, Historic Districts, Texas Comments (0) 21

Almost a month since my last blog, which was shared 255 times but only read 69? Here in San Antonio we are cautiously emerging from the pandemic. This is normally Fiesta Week, the greatest celebration in San Antonio since 1891, but it has been put off until late June. Taking a cue from New Orleans as we so often have, the King William district (first in Texas!) encouraged residents to decorate their houses like parade floats, allowing Fiesta to live in a socially distanced way.

This was my favorite, combining the traditions of medals and luchadores.
Quetzalcoatl in Baja King William
This is my favorite house in King William.

As I have noted many times over the last year, the work of heritage conservation has not slowed down a bit as the pace of construction and development continues speedily in our fast-growing city. The old El Mirador restaurant was largely demolished, although we helped insure that five old stone walls within the complex will be preserved in the new Rosario’s restaurant (best roasted tomato salsa IMHO).

Four walls are being preserved in place, while this one is being carefully dismantled for reerection with the new structure.

The town is full of new construction, which tends to pack many units on small lots, like these stick-built zoning envelopes going up on Evergreen on the edge of Tobin Hill, replacing some nice early 20C houses. We have four new hotels opening downtown, at least two of them quite luxurious. We are also seeing more highrise housing planned for the central area, confirming what I said a year ago about what the pandemic means for urban density.

The Arts Hotel & Thompson residences
The Canopy lurking over the Riverwalk

The other development I have been watching on my morning bike rides is the construction of a replica rampart at the southwest corner of Alamo Plaza for a temporary (really?) exhibit of a replica 18-pounder cannon used in the unsuccessful defense of the Alamo in 1836. It also includes a replica of the Losoya house which was in the Alamo compound.

Watching it being built kinda kills the illusion.
The code compliant elevator and stair do not enhance the illusion of authenticity.
Very close to Ripley’s Believe It Or Not

The Alamo project appears to be moving forward in a more community-minded way under new leadership (see blog before last).

Oh! I almost forgot! Thanks to the Power of Preservation Foundation, the lovely 1935 Pure Oil gas station on Nogalitos now has a new roof! This was the subject of my most popular blog ever a couple years back.

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