Demolition Daze

July 24, 2019 Sustainability, Texas Comments (2) 1441

Suuummmerr-tiiime and the demolition is easy….

It’s July in San Antonio, which means it is probably hot and it is definitely time to demolish landmark buildings. In addition to the unexpected demolition of the G.J. Sutton Building which began last week without an alibi, this week we are also witnessing the needless removal of two homes on Evergreen near Tobin Hill that are going to be replaced by nine units. (Nine? You have two buildings PLUS a vacant lot and you can’t manage nine units by rehabbing? What development school did you go to?)

Not to mention the Medal of Honor recipient who grew up there.

To add a heaping schlag of cruelty to this demolition sachertorte, they have little kids cheering the demolition of the 1915 Beacon Hill School. Sad. The School District promised to rehab the building three decades ago, let it rot that whole time, and then manipulated schoolchildren and their parents into calling for its demolition by putting up an unnecessary fence and pretending the building was a hazard to the nearby playground.

Teaching moment. Curious how it isn’t a hazard for the kids to be there during demolition.

In another era, that would be called lying. Anyway, there were the kids in cute little hardhats, egging on the claws and dumptrucks and firehoses.

Who is responsible? The Sutton Building was a State decision that excluded the City. Evergreen and Beacon Hill were City Council decisions, and Almaguer was a Historic and Design Review decision. Meanwhile, check out this heat map showing demolitions near the Tobin Hill and Monte Vista historic districts.

This is why people want to live in historic districts.
Image courtesy City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation.

So, come to San Antonio in the summer! Where else can you get so many different and delightful demolitions going on at the same time? The sun might feel hot but we got lots of fire hoses running round the clock!

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Frank Lloyd Wright Demolished

January 11, 2018 Economics Comments (1) 1749

Last summer I was visiting my daughter in Kalispell, Montana, a lovely historic town.  One day we toured nearby Whitefish, which has a small history museum but was quite the contrast, as I mentioned in a blog HERE.  The one highlight was our discovery of a late Frank Lloyd Wright building, even labeled as such – completed as a medical office in 1961.

I am on the Board of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and at the time I remembered the controversy and concern for the building.  Modest, it still echoed the Marin County complex in its rolling sculpted eave and horizontal emphasis.

But this week it looks like this

Why?  The pat answer is greed, but the real answer is hidden behind a seeming expression of greed: $1.7 million.  The blatantly unreasonable request almost sounds like “$1.7 million or I kill the building!”  And he followed through, which may have been the intention all along.  The piles of rubble remind me of the 1972 piles of the old Chicago Stock Exchange, which was similarly flipped up until it had a price it could not sustain, because real estate is the only asset class whose value is fully externalized.

It is usually a con.  Those silly preservationists think it is valuable, so I will ask them for too much money and then blame them when I demolish it.  Which is exactly, in every aspect, how a kidnapping for ransom works.

This was the trade Chicago made in 1972 after the Adler & Sullivan Chicago Stock Exchange was flipped by promoters to an unsustainable value.  To be replaced by a physical absence, a building that you can’t even look at for more than a second if you try.

So, that is the greed angle and the ransom angle, but what about The Vacant Lot Myth: that a cleared site is worth more for an owner?  I covered this a couple years back HERE.  It is like The Beige – what realtors tell you to paint your walls to appeal to the widest possible audience.  Not the best audience, not the best price, but the largest potential market.  Which leads to absences.

Here is your tradeoff!

Sadly, the absence in Whitefish builds on a local legacy of absence.  There is a plaque where they tore down their oldest building about five years ago.   Tourists may still come through on their way to Glacier Park but they will have less reason to linger, less to see, and less to remember.

 

 

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Plainfield: Historic?

April 7, 2010 Chicago Buildings, Economics, Historic Districts Comments (0) 984

Another downtown bites the dust – or should we say drinks the Kool-Aid? The latter phrase has been overly misused the last decade or two but it is quite appropriate. Historic downtown Plainfield – a lovely Will County town west of Lockport, has voted down historic landmark status, despite a 21-20 majority of downtown property owners being in favor of it. This was reported in the Chicago Tribune today.

Despite the slim majority of owners in favor, Village trustees voted 4-2 against the district, essentially caving to a minority. Negative motivations – like fear – tend to trump the positive motivations, like the economic security provided by knowing what kind of downtown you are going to have in the future. Another negative motivation: fear of the frightening property regulators, who have somehow not interfered with two renovations of this historic property owned by Pat Andreasen, listed on the state, national and local registers.

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